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Tag Archive clock repair

clock with a large face and curved case

Thwaites And Reed balloon clock | Clock of the week

A very impressive mid to late 19th century Balloon clock by the eminent clockmaker Thwaites and Reed. 


The proportions of this clock are just right for a clock of this size being exactly 70cm high (27.5″). The mahogany case is very well made. With its flame panel to the front and boxwood inlay to the dial surround. Due the size and age of this clock there is some cracking to the top curve. This is usually the case with balloon clock of this type.


The 12″ well made cast brass dial is made of three pieces. Being a lovely matted centre piece, a rear dial ring and a very good chapter ring with quarter markers and waxed numerals.


The double fusee movement is simply impressive! It is 23cm square (9″) and the plates at least a quarter of an inch thick. The fusee runs on a beautifully engineered chain. I have personally restored this movement to a very high standard.

The movement is stamped T&R for THWAITES AND REED and the serial number is 15503.


This clock was a complete one off. As well as being a small fortune to have manufactured it was certainly made specifically for a large house. Indeed, I acquired the clock from a very impressive Victorian house in Whitchurch. It really did look amazing on a table in the reception hallway.

This piece and many others are currently available for purchase on our selling antiques page.

Unfortunately this piece has been purchased. However we still have many pieces available for purchase on our selling antiques page.

William IV period bracket clock – Tick Tock Thursday

This week’s horological shenanigans have seen us fully restore a William IV period bracket clock. This rare clock takes cues from the grand tours and has an Egyptian feel to the design. This is a stunningly original flame mahogany double fusee striking bracket clock.


The Egyptian influenced case is finished in a wonderfully deep flame mahogany. This is only seen in the finest of early 19th century clocks. Finished off with fine brass inlay scrolls, flower heads with ebony inserts and cross banding to the stepped top. I have very carefully removed all the layers of dirt and soot to reveal the original shellac high polish finish. This has to be seen to be fully appreciated.


The double fusee movement is totally handmade with its hand cut crossing to all the wheels. These crossings making the shape of a star. The overall quality of the movement is excellent and has been totally overhauled by me personally. So I can give a full three years guarantee to safeguard your investment.


The original convex dial has received the most careful of conservation based cleaning. As such it compliments the rest of the clock.
I would date this clock to William IV ( c1830) 


William IV period bracket clock
William IV period bracket clock face
William IV period bracket clock

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Vulliamy clock – Tick Tock Thursday

Horological shenanigans have seen quite a few notable clocks pass through the shop, the best being a clock by Vulliamy.

Benjamin Vulliamy (1747 – 31 December 1811), was a clockmaker responsible for building the Regulator Clock, which, between 1780 and 1884, was the official regulator of time in London.

Benjamin Vulliamy was the son of Justin Vulliamy, a clockmaker of Swiss origin, who moved to London around 1730. Justin became an associate of Benjamin Gray, a watchmaker established in Pall Mall, and married Mary, a daughter of the same, with whom he had Benjamin. Justin succeeded his father-in-law in the charge of the business and from 1780, his son Benjamin entered the society. Father and son worked together until the death of Justin, on 1 December 1797.

From an early age, Vulliamy had shown interest in pursuing his father’s career. As an adult, he began to earn a reputation as a builder of mantel clocks. Decorative timepieces that adorned the halls of high society (some can be found at the Derby Museum and Art Gallery). His talent earned him a Royal Appointment in 1773. Through this he came to receive an endowment of £150 a year as George III’s King’s Clockmaker. There was a similar distinction, Royal Watchmaker, then held by George Lindsay. The king, an enthusiast for watches and mechanical devices, was patron of Justin Vulliamy. However, only Benjamin received this significant honour.

Around 1780, Vulliamy was commissioned to build the Regulator Clock. The main timekeeper of the King’s Observatory Kew, which served as an unofficial Prime Meridian and was responsible for the official London time until 1884. After which the Greenwich Royal Observatory assumed both roles. The Regulator Clock is now in the Science Museum in London.

In 1780 Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy was born; he was the last to dedicate himself to the family clockmaking business. None of his descendants took up the art of clockmaking, although his son, Lewis, was notable as an architect.

The Vulliamy clocks

Vulliamy clocks were of considerable value and represented the climax of technology at the time. one such clock was presented to the Chinese emperor by the diplomatic mission of George Macartney to Beijing in 1793. Vulliamy clocks were combined with fine porcelain figures to create artefacts that combined both science and art. The overall design was made by Vulliamy. He employed prize-winning sculptors such as John Deare to create the figures that were influenced by contemporary French designs. The Vulliamy family used Crown Derby to make the figures from porcelain designs. One of Vulliamy’s assistants, Jacques Planche, was a brother of Andrew Planche who had been involved in the early Derby Porcelain business. The business also subcontracted much of the clocks’ manufacture to other skilled artisans.

a porcelain clock face belonging to a Vulliamy Clock
the word Vulliamy London NS 1718 inscribed on a metalplate
a porcelain clock face belonging to a Vulliamy Clock

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Christmas Closing

Merry Christmas one an all!

Overton Clocks are now closed until Tuesday 2nd January 2018.

Wishing you all a good Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Carriage clock – Tick Tock Thursday

Here is a complicated carriage clock with both Petit and Grand Sonniere Striking.. enjoy!!

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Charlie Chaplin – Tick Tock Thursday

Ey up!! It’s tick tick Thursday! This week is the turn of Charlie Chaplin to teach you about the art of horology and customer service!! I’m not sure if I should be watching… 🤓 enjoy!

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19th century digital clock – Tick Tock Thursday

A couple of marvellous clocks in this week for you… the first is an extremely rare 19th century digital clock! It came to us in a very sorry state and required a bit of research to find the original patent so we could repair it! It’s a shame to put the dial back on now. Enjoy!

digital clock  in case
19th century digital clock
19th century digital clock frace

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Palatial Regulator – Tick Tock Thursday

This week we’re focusing on our amazing apprentice Jessica! Jessica has been with us for over a year now and is moving onto the finer clocks we work with. This palatial regulator has been fully restored from a very tired state and is now ready for a good number of years service again.. enjoy!

Jessica the apprentice working on a palatial regulator

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New Showroom – Tick Tock Thursday

We’ve had a bit of a change around here at Overton Clocks. We now have a showroom with a lovely selection of clocks for sale. Whether it’s a miniature carriage clock or a rare 18th century long case clock.. we should have something for you. The team are all together in their new workshop. Which will help with training.

Showroom fireplace
showroom corner with a chair and lots of wall mounted and long case clocks
Showroom small set of drawers

Risqué Strike/Repeat Carriage Clock c1867

Risqué Strike/Repeat Carriage Clock
an image inscribed on a clock of a scantily clad woman
Risqué Strike/Repeat Carriage Clock c1867

We have recently restored this marvellous and rather
risqué strike/repeat carriage clock which is now for sale. It has a date of 1867 inscribed under the baseplate and the maker inscribed “M.P” behind the dial! with rare Images on the glass depicting rather risqué ladies! For Victorian 1867… this would have been a mischievous purchase.. enjoy!! Purchase it from our sellingantuiques.co.uk page if its not already been snapped up!

back of a carriage clock with the inner parts showing
An image of a risqué lady on a clock

Tick Tock Thursday! – Cube Clock

A rather nice cube clock and a clock that needed a new suspension top making from scratch!  

Posted by Overton Clocks on Thursday, 23 February 2017

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Tick Tock Thursday! – hand made pendulum stay

A proper bit of clockmaking this week! To begin with, creating a hand made pendulum stay for an 18th century bracket clock. Also, Jess the apprentice is really coming on in leaps and bounds. Here she is restoring a marvellous Bennet triple longcase movement with a massive set of bells! Hence, It’s very loud! Enjoy…🤓

Posted by Overton Clocks on Thursday, 2 March 2017

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Regulator with Calendar

regulator with calendar clock face
regulator with calendar full case

Striking Longcase Regulator with calendar and the age and phase of the moon by Thomas Morgan of Manchester c1860.

This is a remarkably complex clock for a regulator with calendar. It must really be considered a borderline example due the ease of reading the dial. The case is of walnut and above the panelled plinth it is glazed at the front and sides and around the arched top. There is carved fretwork below the circular dial.

The dial has no less than six subsidiary dials and is laid out in a regulator fashion. The main dial is a centre seconds dial. With the hour dial at 9 o’clock and the minute dial at 3. At 6 o’clock is the date dial with the signature on either side of it. At 12 o’clock is the month dial with. On its right, the days of the week and on the left the dial showing the age and phase of the moon.

The substantial movement has a dead-beat escapement and maintaining power. The pendulum has a wood rod and heavy lead bob covered in a brass as are the substantial weights.

regulators cogs
regulator mechanism with pendulum
regulators cogs on back of mechanism
regulators cogs on back of mechanism
regulators cogs on back of mechanism
regulators cogs on back of mechanism

Tick Tock Tuesday! – 19th Century Pocket Watch

It’s tick tock Tuesday again! The theme of this week has been “tiny!” A 19th century pocket watch needed a broken pivot repairing and a Ruby pin fitting to the balance assembly. The second was a brace of new platform escapements needing fitting to two carriage clocks. Enjoy! 🤓

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Early French Clock with Automated Ship

An excellent piece of Automata. an early French clock with automated ship riding a rough sea! A bit of careful restoration needed with the delicate “paper tissue” sea that is already showing signs of fragility….. enjoy! 🤓

Early French Clock with Automated Ship

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