• 01246 204978
  • info@overtonclocks.co.uk

Tag Archive 19th century

A quadruple cased pocket watch by Edward Prior

Quadruple Cased Pocket Watch | Clock of the Week

This week a very rare quadruple cased pocket watch by the eminent Edward Prior (1800 – 1868) 

I have restored and worked on a number of Edward Prior watches in the past. But have only ever seen one other quadruple cased ottoman style pocket watch, and the quality of this one is simply outstanding.

The three inner cases are hallmarked London 1828 and the outer Clam shell is no marked. After some research, the custom was to export the triple cased watch to Turkey and then the outer forth case was manufactured in Turkey before retailing.

The fusee verge movement has been fully restored by me. Now, it is in an amazing condition showing little wear for its years of age! The “ottoman” style porcelain dial is in perfect condition displaying the makers name and Arabic style numerals. 

With over twenty years experience in restoring and conserving clocks and working on some of the finest and complicated clocks for a select group of the best antique clock dealers in the country. We are proud to say that we are now the exclusive restoration company for Steam Mill Clocks.
As well as this, Overton Clocks has now decided to offer our customers the opportunity to purchase fine antique clocks that have been personally selected for their unique or special features. Each clock has been expertly restored to the highest of standards by myself. Overton clocks ensures peace of mind in your investment, by personally offering three years warranty on all of our timepieces. 

I am a master clockmaker. A Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers and a member of the British watch and clockmakers guild. Overton Clocks is a traditional clock shop based in the heart of Chesterfield. Hosting a showroom and in-house fully equipped workshop.

This piece and many others are currently available for purchase on our selling antiques page.
Unfortunately this piece has been purchased. However we still have many pieces available for purchase on our selling antiques page.

Quarter Striking Bracket Clock – Tick Tock Thursday

This week’s horological shenanigans have seen us receive a lovely quarter striking bracket clock from Cincinnati, Ohio in the USA! We are proud to say that the owner had researched for quality restorations. As such he had chosen Overton Clocks to fully restore his Winterhalder and Hoffmier 19th century clock. This lovely clock is quite unusual. Having a beautifully carved oak case with gilt ormolu frets and finials. The movement chimes every quarter of an hour on four gongs and has a “silence” lever at the 3 o’clock position.

Firstly, we plan to carefully remove all of the ormolu. Then, we will be removing the layers of dirt and grime from the case layer by layer until the original polished finish is revealed. We will then completely dismantle the clock down to its last nut and bolt. Then completely overhauled so that it can give many years of good service, it should look amazing when its finished. The quality of the packing case supplied by International Export Packers of Newark is excellent. I would highly recommend them. They handled all the documents needed for a temporary Import/export licence so that we can restore the quarter striking bracket clock and get it back to the USA hassle free.

a large wooden crate
Quarter striking bracket clock
A large wooden crate with Styrofoam packaging inside

A large wooden crate with Styrofoam packaging inside

Post From Facebook

Vulliamy clock – Tick Tock Thursday

Horological shenanigans have seen quite a few notable clocks pass through the shop, the best being a clock by Vulliamy.

Benjamin Vulliamy (1747 – 31 December 1811), was a clockmaker responsible for building the Regulator Clock, which, between 1780 and 1884, was the official regulator of time in London.

Benjamin Vulliamy was the son of Justin Vulliamy, a clockmaker of Swiss origin, who moved to London around 1730. Justin became an associate of Benjamin Gray, a watchmaker established in Pall Mall, and married Mary, a daughter of the same, with whom he had Benjamin. Justin succeeded his father-in-law in the charge of the business and from 1780, his son Benjamin entered the society. Father and son worked together until the death of Justin, on 1 December 1797.

From an early age, Vulliamy had shown interest in pursuing his father’s career. As an adult, he began to earn a reputation as a builder of mantel clocks. Decorative timepieces that adorned the halls of high society (some can be found at the Derby Museum and Art Gallery). His talent earned him a Royal Appointment in 1773. Through this he came to receive an endowment of £150 a year as George III’s King’s Clockmaker. There was a similar distinction, Royal Watchmaker, then held by George Lindsay. The king, an enthusiast for watches and mechanical devices, was patron of Justin Vulliamy. However, only Benjamin received this significant honour.

Around 1780, Vulliamy was commissioned to build the Regulator Clock. The main timekeeper of the King’s Observatory Kew, which served as an unofficial Prime Meridian and was responsible for the official London time until 1884. After which the Greenwich Royal Observatory assumed both roles. The Regulator Clock is now in the Science Museum in London.

In 1780 Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy was born; he was the last to dedicate himself to the family clockmaking business. None of his descendants took up the art of clockmaking, although his son, Lewis, was notable as an architect.

The Vulliamy clocks

Vulliamy clocks were of considerable value and represented the climax of technology at the time. one such clock was presented to the Chinese emperor by the diplomatic mission of George Macartney to Beijing in 1793. Vulliamy clocks were combined with fine porcelain figures to create artefacts that combined both science and art. The overall design was made by Vulliamy. He employed prize-winning sculptors such as John Deare to create the figures that were influenced by contemporary French designs. The Vulliamy family used Crown Derby to make the figures from porcelain designs. One of Vulliamy’s assistants, Jacques Planche, was a brother of Andrew Planche who had been involved in the early Derby Porcelain business. The business also subcontracted much of the clocks’ manufacture to other skilled artisans.

a porcelain clock face belonging to a Vulliamy Clock
the word Vulliamy London NS 1718 inscribed on a metalplate
a porcelain clock face belonging to a Vulliamy Clock

Post from Facebook

Carriage clock – Tick Tock Thursday

Here is a complicated carriage clock with both Petit and Grand Sonniere Striking.. enjoy!!

Post from Facebook

19th century digital clock – Tick Tock Thursday

A couple of marvellous clocks in this week for you… the first is an extremely rare 19th century digital clock! It came to us in a very sorry state and required a bit of research to find the original patent so we could repair it! It’s a shame to put the dial back on now. Enjoy!

digital clock  in case
19th century digital clock
19th century digital clock frace

Read more on Facebook

Risqué Strike/Repeat Carriage Clock c1867

Risqué Strike/Repeat Carriage Clock
an image inscribed on a clock of a scantily clad woman
Risqué Strike/Repeat Carriage Clock c1867

We have recently restored this marvellous and rather
risqué strike/repeat carriage clock which is now for sale. It has a date of 1867 inscribed under the baseplate and the maker inscribed “M.P” behind the dial! with rare Images on the glass depicting rather risqué ladies! For Victorian 1867… this would have been a mischievous purchase.. enjoy!! Purchase it from our sellingantuiques.co.uk page if its not already been snapped up!

back of a carriage clock with the inner parts showing
An image of a risqué lady on a clock

Regulator with Calendar

regulator with calendar clock face
regulator with calendar full case

Striking Longcase Regulator with calendar and the age and phase of the moon by Thomas Morgan of Manchester c1860.

This is a remarkably complex clock for a regulator with calendar. It must really be considered a borderline example due the ease of reading the dial. The case is of walnut and above the panelled plinth it is glazed at the front and sides and around the arched top. There is carved fretwork below the circular dial.

The dial has no less than six subsidiary dials and is laid out in a regulator fashion. The main dial is a centre seconds dial. With the hour dial at 9 o’clock and the minute dial at 3. At 6 o’clock is the date dial with the signature on either side of it. At 12 o’clock is the month dial with. On its right, the days of the week and on the left the dial showing the age and phase of the moon.

The substantial movement has a dead-beat escapement and maintaining power. The pendulum has a wood rod and heavy lead bob covered in a brass as are the substantial weights.

regulators cogs
regulator mechanism with pendulum
regulators cogs on back of mechanism
regulators cogs on back of mechanism
regulators cogs on back of mechanism
regulators cogs on back of mechanism

Tick Tock Tuesday! – 19th Century Pocket Watch

It’s tick tock Tuesday again! The theme of this week has been “tiny!” A 19th century pocket watch needed a broken pivot repairing and a Ruby pin fitting to the balance assembly. The second was a brace of new platform escapements needing fitting to two carriage clocks. Enjoy! 🤓

Link to post

a pocket watch before being cleaned

1830 Gold Pocket Watch

Here is a short video of an 1830 gold pocket watch after it had received the Overton clock treatment!

in other news, we won a national contract with a very well known high street jeweller. Went to the brilliant Chesterfield Retail Awards as a finalist.


Also, continued growth means we can offer a chance for a clockmaking apprentice! The successful candidate will undertake a level 3 – 5 diploma in Horology. Organised by the BHI and finally have a chance of completing a Horology degree at Birmingham University!

Contact us with any queries today or find us on Facebook for updates on our horological shenanigans

chronometer mechanism

1820s Ships Chronometer

Something really special this week, This is very early and very rare eight day marine Chronometer dating from around c1820.. It is believed that this Chronometer was one used in the sea trials used to win the longitude prize.. John Harrison finally won the prize in the mid 1800s.. This clock was in a really dirty state with a broken Detent on the detent escapement. We manufactured a new one. Along with a handmade bush on the centre arbor made from old brass to match the colour. It’s work like this that really makes this adventure worth it pictures of before and after…

 

 

 

William Webster Longcase Clock

William Webster Bracket Clock

A William Webster Bracket clock in for restoration. This clock features a highly engraved back plate. With double fusee movement and verge escapement and subsidiary dial depicting the phase of the moon and a date ring. The owners discovered this clock in a loft, and were preparing it for sale. William Webster was the apprentice of the eminent Thomas Tompion. At any rate, a beautiful piece by one of the most prominent clock makers in the country.

Find us on Facebook for updates on all the goings on here at Overton Clocks

William Webster Bracket Clock mechanism
William Webster Bracket Clock mechanism
William Webster Bracket Clock face
Clock mechanism with clock face attached

.

19th Century Longcase Clock

19th Century Long Case Clock

19th Century Longcase Clock face and mechanism

This stunning 19th Century Long case Clock came in for full restoration including re bushing, cleaning and testing. In fact, this classic Long case clock which was a absolute pleasure to work on.

Find us on Facebook for more more horological shenanigans

a pocket watch after cleaning

1950s Trebex and a 1960s Avia

Another day of repairing watches. Here are some before and after pictures of these stunning 1950s Trebex and a 1960s Avia watches.

Contact us today about your clock or watch repair, or find us on Facebook

a 1950s Trebex or a 1960s Avia pocket watch partly dismantled
a 1950s Trebex or a 1960s Avia pocket watch partly dismantled
a 1950s Trebex or a 1960s Avia pocket watch partly dismantled
a 1950s Trebex or a 1960s Avia pocket watch partly dismantled