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Tag Archive 18th century clocks

John Everell Bracket Clock| Tick Tock Thursday

This week has seen us start the restoration on a lovely early 18th century ebonised bracket clock with “silent pull” by John Everell. The case is a wonderfully small in size being 15″ high with the handle down. The natural ageing and patina is simply lovely. We intend to gently clean and wax the case to preserve this finish. The 6″ dial is framed with “flower” spandrels which date this clock to around c1745.

The makers name is engraved in the top arch. John Everell traded from “By the new church” The Strand London from c1730 to c1760. The highly engraved five knopped pillar movement with depictions of birds and scrolls has a verge escapement and a pull mechanism that rings the hours and quarter hours on two bells. As you can see from the photos, the plates have been polished using chalk and look brilliant! The next couple of days should see the rest of the clock repaired and polished.

John Everell Bracket clock, with a gold handle and spandrels. the face of the clock is white and the case is black
John Everell Bracket clock, with a gold handle and spandrels. the face of the clock is white and the case is black
John Everell Bracket clock, with a gold handle and spandrels. the face of the clock is white and the case is black

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Barrauds Mahogany bracket clock

Barrauds Mahogany Bracket Clock| Clock of the week

A beautifully well proportioned Georgian Deep Mahogany Striking Bracket Clock by Barrauds of London is our feature piece this week.
The Barrauds family were prolific Clock & Watchmakers, particularly specialising in Chronometers. Paul Philip Barraud was Master of Clockmakers Company in 1810 & 1811. He partnered Howells & Jamison in the late 18th century to make Mudges Timekeepers. He died in 1820, his two sons continued the business into the late 19th century.

The mahogany case is in a most lovely original condition having a brass binding to the base and very heavy gilt brass Corinthian columns to the four corners, each corner finished with a gilt brass finial. The pagoda type top features a finely cut fret panel to all four sides and again has a matching finial to the top. Two heavy brass handles adorn the sides and set the clock off nice against the unusual gilt brass sound frets.

This is an impressive clock and stands well giving it a presence and elegance you only get with Georgian clocks of this age. The painted dial bearing the name Barrauds, Cornhill, London is of a style that only lasted a few years and Brian Loomes called this era period two, Having Arabic numerals to the chapter ring and the family name of Barrauds only dates this clock to somewhere around 1800 – 1813.

The very well made five pillar fully engraved movement features a strike/silence and a date ring along with an anchor escapement. This clock was originally a crownwheel (verge) escapement clock but looking at the wear in the wheels and pinions, it was converted to Anchor escapement sometime in the late 19th century. This type of conversion was quite normal when the owner was wanting a clock with a more accurate and stable timekeeping characteristic and this conversion was done to a very high standard using very well made components.

I did contemplate “re-converting” the clock back to a crownwheel clock but have decided to keep it as intended by its former owner, because of the age of the conversion and the fact that it is part of this clocks history.
The clock also features a pull repeat function ( the cord has not been fitted in the photo) and the cord colour and bead can be chosen by you. The movement has been totally overhauled by me personally and has been restored to its original condition to match the condition of the case.


This piece and many others are currently available for purchase on our selling antiques page.

Unfortunately this piece has been purchased. However, we still have many pieces available for purchase on our selling antiques page.

18th Century Bracket Clocks| Tick Tock Thursday

A bit of case restoration on two beautiful 18th century bracket clocks. The first is a large, very deep red mahogany bracket clock by Barrauds of London. The case has heavy Corinthian columns to the four corners and ornate hand cut brass fretwork panel to the side. The painted dial with date ring has been sent away for sympathetic restoration of the winding holes as they have become chipped over time. The highly engraved movement is currently being totally overhauled by me and should be on test very soon.

The second clock is a lovely mid 18th century mahogany veneered clock by James Eley. James worked from 1753 to 1795 and he produced some very well made clocks. This particular one has the “better” cross cut mahogany veneer to the inner masking. Also featuring a lovely brass frets to the front top corners. The movement for this clock has a very highly engraved back-plate and verge (crownwheel) escapement. And also includes a complicated dial with two subsidiary dials, date ring and ornate spandrels.

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Style Georgian bracket clock 2| Tick Tock Thursday

This week we’ve finish the very rare Georgian bracket clock that we illustrated a few weeks ago. This well proportioned George II inverted bell top mahogany bracket clock by the 18th century maker Nathaniel Style. This clock has received the most careful of restorations to retain its original shellac finish. Which is in an amazing original condition and its original winding key.

It is not very often that a completely original base model clock appears in such amazing condition. When acquired by us, this clock was covered in many layers of grime and dust. Having spent at least 100 years in a dry attic of a large house. I have included a couple of photographs of the case being carefully cleaned to reveal its totally original finish. I have done this to demonstrate that we have not re-polished this clock in any way.

The very well made case is veneered in a good quality mahogany. With it being a base model it is devoid of any brass frills and fussiness and has a simple wooden fret to the two top corners of the front door and a substantial brass handle to the top. The rear door has been made far more substantially than is required and still has the case makers chisel marks that have been let in to allow the pendulum the swing freely. I cannot express how lovely this clock is and has to be seen to be believed.

The timepiece movement has a crown wheel (verge) escapement and has its original suspension holding the “free” pendulum. This type of escapement was a transition between the rigid knife edge type crown wheel escapement where the pendulum is directly connected to the pallet arbour and the anchor escapement with its separately suspended pendulum and reduced pendulum arc. This escapement has a large pendulum arc. This is demonstrated by the mock pendulum during operation but the maker is clearly trying to experiment with the new technological developments that were coming into horology. The movement has been totally overhauled by me. However it is in as original a condition as I can get it without removing any of its past history.

It is very rare that these timepiece clocks survived beyond the 19th century because they were in essence a base model without any frill, striking mechanisms or alarm work. They simply told the time. As was the case with “modern” 1950s mantle clocks of today. These basic clocks were mistreated and thrown away when worn out due to the cost of repairing them.

This clock has somehow managed to be carefully stored away when it finally became surplus to requirements or the cost of repair outweighed the value of the clock and stayed there for many years! The patina and simple elegance of this clock has to be seen to be fully appreciated. I believe it would be a very good addition to any collection or someone with an eye for Georgian style.

Nathaniel Style is recorded as working at Wood Street, Cheapside, London. Becoming free of the Clock makers Company in 1725 and retiring in 1773.

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Nathaniel Style bracket clock

Nathaniel Style Bracket Clock| Clock of the Week

This week well proportioned George II inverted bell top mahogany bracket clock by the 18th century maker Nathaniel Style. This clock has received the most careful of restorations to retain its original shellac finish which is in an amazing original condition and its original winding key.

It is not very often that a completely original base model clock appears in such amazing condition. When acquired by us, this clock was covered in many layers of grime and dust having spent at least 100 years in a dry attic of a large house. I have included a couple of photographs of the case being carefully cleaned to reveal its totally original finish. I have done this to demonstrate that we have not re-polished this clock in any way. The very well made case is veneered in a good quality mahogany and with it being a base model it is devoid of any brass frills and fussiness and has a simple wooden fret to the two top corners of the front door and a substantial brass handle to the top. The rear door has been made far more substantially than is required and still has the case makers chisel marks that have been let in to allow the pendulum the swing freely. I cannot express how lovely this clock is and has to be seen to be believed.

The timepiece movement has a crown wheel (verge) escapement and has its original suspension holding the “free” pendulum. This type of escapement was a transition between the rigid knife edge type crown wheel escapement where the pendulum is directly connected to the pallet arbour and the anchor escapement with its separately suspended pendulum and reduced pendulum arc. This escapement has a large pendulum arc and this is demonstrated by the mock pendulum during operation but the maker is clearly trying to experiment with the new technological developments that were coming into horology. The movement has been totally overhauled by me and is in as original condition as I can get it without removing any of its past history.

It is very rare that these timepiece clocks survived beyond the 19th century because they were in essence a base model without any frill, striking mechanisms or alarm work. They simply told the time and as is the case with “modern” 1950s mantle clocks of today, these basic clocks were mistreated and thrown away when worn out due to the cost of repairing them.

This clock has somehow managed to be carefully stored away when it finally became surplus to requirements or the cost of repair outweighed the value of the clock and stayed there for many years! The patina and simple elegance of this clock has to be seen to be fully appreciated and I believe it would be a very good addition to a valued collection or someone with an eye for Georgian style.

Nathaniel Style is recorded as working at Wood Street, Cheapside, London becoming free of the Clock makers Company in 1725 and retiring in 1773.
With over twenty years experience in restoring and conserving clocks and working on some of the finest and complicated clocks for a select group of the best antique clock dealers in the country, Overton Clocks has now decided to offer our customers the opportunity to purchase fine antique clocks that have been personally selected for their unique or special features. Each clock has been expertly restored to the highest of standards by myself. Overton clocks ensures peace of mind in your investment, by personally offering three years warranty on all of our timepieces.

This piece and many others are currently available for purchase on our selling antiques page.

Unfortunately this piece has been purchased. However we still have many pieces available for purchase on our selling antiques page.

A double fusee painted bracket clock with many religious style paintings around the dial

Double Fusee Painted Bracket Clock | Clock of the Week

This weeks stunning clock of the week is a very rare Painted double fusee strike/pull repeat Bracket Clock with early Gesso and finely painted dial. Knife edge crownwheel (verge) escapement and beautifully engraved backplate. The Back plate bearing the name Taylor London. There is a name on the dial and it could be Samuel Taylor, London. I will confirm this in due course.

Here at Overton Clocks we pride ourselves in offering unusual and rare clocks and this one is both. This clock dates from around c1770 and during this period the styles and designs of the bracket clock was at its most diverse. Deryck Roberts describes this period as the “confusion of styles”. We had bell top, inverted bell top, arch dial, full arch dial and variations based on influences of the grand tours. There was also the increasing styles and competition coming over from France and Germany as well.

This particular clock is the very essence of the period. The well made mahogany case with its exaggerated bell top and glazed panels to the side and rear door is completely covered in a “Faux Tortoiseshell” painted effect with gilt pin striping around the edges and delicately painted gilt scrollwork to the corners. The condition of this clock is simply stunning! It is totally original and untouched in anyway and it has taken 250 years for it to look like this.

There are small flecks of paint missing and the odd scratch to the case. However, In all that time this clock has never been “touched up”, polished or repaired. The clock was covered in a very deep layer of dust when I acquired it. I have simply removed this dust very carefully to reveal the clock you see today. I am sure that a professional Painting restorer could fully clean the paint and “repaint” the missing flecks to make it perfect and as new. But as I was told as a young apprentice 20 years ago, its taken a few lifetimes to look like this and it would only take a few hours to remove it.. so I will leave it exactly how it is.

The Beautifully engraved double fusee movement has the early “Knife edge” Crown wheel (verge) escapement. Pull repeating rack striking mechanism with lovely scrollwork to the rack tail and head. There is a silence mechanism on this clock which is operated via a lever in the arch.

The movement had very little wear and shows very little evidence of previous repairs. This giving more fuel to the argument that this clock is a true time warp that has spent most of its life hidden away and not being used. To ensure that I can give you a full three years guarantee and confidence in your investment I have very carefully restored the movement to a high standard. In keeping with the case, I have not removed any of the original grain finish using propriety metal polishes. But simply removed all of the old dirt and grease to reveal the original colour and shine. Ensuring the clock operates as intended.


The original painted dial is also in a most original condition. Having five individually painted scenes in the four corners and the arch. The scenes are of the four seasons and have been painted to a very high standard with gesso beading to the edges. The painting in the arch being father time with the text “Time how short, Eternity how long”. These totally handmade dials are not to be confused with the mass produced painted dials of the 19th century. These dials were more expensive than their brass equivalent and would have been made to order. As with the condition of the clock, this dial is totally original without any repairs or “touch ups”. There is a small scratch to the dial vertically above the 6/7 but it does not detract from it. 

This piece and many others are currently available for purchase on our selling antiques page.

Unfortunately this piece has been purchased. However, we still have many pieces available for purchase on our selling antiques page.

Painted Double Fusee Bracket Clock |Tick Tock Thursday

This week has seen us complete the restoration of a very rare Painted double fusee strike/pull repeat Bracket Clock featuring early Gesso and finely painted dial, Knife edge crownwheel (verge) escapement and beautifully engraved backplate. The Back plate bearing the name Taylor London. There is a name on the dial and it could be Samuel Taylor, London. I will confirm this in due course.

Here at Overton Clocks we pride ourselves in offering unusual and rare clocks and this one is both. This clock dates from around c1770. During this period the styles and designs of the bracket clock was at its most diverse. Deryck Roberts describes this period as the “confusion of styles”. We had bell top, inverted bell top, arch dial, full arch dial and variations based on influences of the grand tours. There was also the increasing styles and competition coming over from France and Germany as well.
This particular clock is the very essence of the period. The well made mahogany case with its exaggerated bell top and glazed panels to the side and rear door is completely covered in a “Faux Tortoiseshell” painted effect with gilt pin striping around the edges and delicately painted gilt scroll work to the corners.

The condition of this clock is simply stunning! It took 250 years to look like this and is totally original and untouched. There are small flecks of paint missing and the odd scratch to the case. The piece has never has a touch up polish or repair until now. Dust covered the clock deeply when I aquired it. So I have simply removed this dust very carefully to reveal the clock you see today.

I am sure that a professional Painting restorer could fully clean the paint and “repaint” the missing flecks to make it perfect. But as someone told me as a young apprentice 20 years ago. Its taken a few lifetimes to look like this and it would only take a few hours to remove it. So I will leave it exactly how it is.

The Beautifully engraved double fusee movement has the early “Knife edge” Crown wheel (verge) escapement. Pull repeating rack striking mechanism with lovely scroll work to the rack tail and head. The clock features a silencing mechanism operated by a lever in the arch. The movement had very little wear and shows very little evidence of previous repairs. This giving more fuel to the argument that this clock is a true time warp. Hidden away and in disuse.

To ensure that I can give you a full three years guarantee and confidence in your investment I have very carefully restored the movement to a high standard. In keeping with the case, I have not removed any of the original grain finish using propriety metal polishes. But simply removed all of the old dirt and grease to reveal the original colour and shine. Ensuring the clock operates as intended.

The original painted dial is also in a most original condition having five individually painted scenes in the four corners and the arch. The dial depicts the four seasons. They have been painted to a very high standard with gesso beading to the edges. The painting in the arch being father time with the text “Time how short, Eternity how long”. The dials are totally handmade. These dials were more expensive than their brass equivalent and would have been made to order. As with the condition of the clock, this dial is totally original without any repairs or “touch ups”. There is a small scratch to the dial vertically above the 6/7 but it does not detract from it. this clock is for sale if your interested! 

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Samuel Taylor Bracket clock | Tick Tock Thursday

Our horological shenanigans have bought us to Germany to purchase an incredibly rare painted bracket clock by Samuel Taylor c1750. I often say I try and source unusual or rare clocks and this is both. The bell top case is is made of mahogany and is painted in a rest rich red/burgundy paint that is in a condition that simply could not be replicated without 300 years of patina added! The gilding to the corners and edging of the apertures is lovely and untouched. I can let you know that I will not be touching the case either! The double fusee strike/pull repeat movement has a silent lever in the arch above “father time” and has a lovely engraving to the back plate. This clock has the earlier “knife edge” crown wheel (verge) escapement and very fine crossings to the wheels . On the dial, there are four paintings for the four seasons. A reminder from Samuel Taylor that time is short, but eternity is long. enjoy!

Samuel Taylor bracket clock

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